Viewing posts for the category studies

data garden #0

Posted by: pangelo on July 27, 2014

data garden participants discussing the technical problems faced by developers of interactive installations

From the outset, dataflower is meant to be a practice based research project. My main motivation for it came from the experience of many years developing digital art installations with diverse teams, noticing many recurring technical and soacial patterns and thinking "there has to be a better way to approach these problems". Most of my research on this project so far has involved creative practice, but mostly in a non-participatory way, through observation, interviews and questionnaires. To actually get involved in creative projects and use practice as a way to shape the development of dataflower, I first need to have a minimal working version which actually does something interesting and useful.

I now have such a prototype of the whole system which I can use as a foundation for more active practice-based research, but I still need people to experiment and to try building projects with it and give me feedback, so I need to start meeting and working together with them more regularly, so i came up with the idea of organizing data gardens.

A data garden is an open collaborative development event for all those interested in learning, working with and improving the dataflower tools and on reflecting about the issues related with parallel, heterogeneous and distributed computing in digital art practice. The focus of each event will depend on the participants interests, but my plan is to have a specific topic to discuss or a new feature to test for each session, which should happen at least once a month.

Last saturday, July 19, I got together with a group of digital artists and researchers at Audiência Zero in Matosinhos, Portugal, to perform a pilot test for these sessions. Since this was a first and the tools are still a bit rough around the edges, I started with a small presentation to present the project and its motivation and to elicit feedback from the participants. I then presented a brief tutorial of FBP concepts using microflow and gave a brief overview of the upcoming libflow library. Next I presented a prototype of the dataflower environment and we had a brainstorming session on mental models for complex systems and collaboration tools.

Many thanks to Audiência Zero for hosting the meeting and to all who participated for their interest and wonderful feedback. The next data garden session is scheduled to take place in Coruña, Spain, from 17 to 21 of September as a work node part of the Artropocode residency, and you are most welcome to join us.

If you want to host or participate in a future data garden event, get in touch.

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Hit the Ground Running

Posted by: pangelo on February 1, 2014

The "Collaborative Practices in Creative Computing" study is now over, and the number of responses has far exceeded my expectations. I'd like to send a big heartfelt Thank You to all who have participated, your input will definitely help me develop new tools which will hopefully help your creative practices.

It will still take some time to fully explore the data from the study and draw some meaningful conclusions, so in the meantime my focus will be on building the code scaffold for dataflower, a minimum base platform that can be publicly released and used to develop creative projects.

As we enter the development stage, I'm also going to try and make better use of this blog as a communication and research platform. So expect more frequent updates beyond the odd announcement here and there.

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Collaborative Practices in Creative Computing

Posted by: pangelo on January 1, 2014

As the first stage after the approval of my research proposal I have been conducting since the summer a set of qualitative and quantitative user studies in order to better understand the work processes and practices surrounding creative applications of technology in New Media Art.

I am especially interested in which technologies and tools are more prevalent, and how these are used to support the creative process and emergent collaborative practices. The process started with informal ethnographic observation performed at artist residencies, from which I gleaned a set of observations that allowed me to do a set of semi-structured interviews with artists and creatives who use creative computing technologies in their work. These interviews resulted in deep, rich insights into the needs and practices of New Media artists in creative environments.

The last step in this set of studies is a broad online questionnaire that aims to quantify with a larger sample some of the salient aspects of the previous studies. If you are an artist or creative using digital technologies to develop your work (especially if involves applications of interactive systems like art installations or live performances), Id like to invite you to take part in this study. and help us improve our understanding of your practice so that we can develop better tools.

Thank you.

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